Geodetic Survey Markers

Permanent survey markers (PSMs)
They can include:
*are substantial marks used by surveyors to identify property boundaries
*Concrete blocks buried with a brass plaque
*Mini marks in the kerb
*These marks are important for various surveying projects

I am passionate about Survey Markers or Geodetic Markers I believe they have a place in the real world space. I collect them and often explore to find them. I have them as my icons on all things digital.
Here is my favourite:
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If you require assistance in relation to Geodetic Markers this is the place to begin a conversation.
Traxi25

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Cross-posting the relevant ‘Criteria challenge’ response from Tintino:

My opinions on survey markers below:
The vast majority of survey markers which I see in review (NSW State Survey Marks) do not have an interesting or historical story. They are required by NSW government to be no more than 500 metres apart, making them highly mass produced. I would not consider them to meet any of the eligibility criteria. I would consider these not distinct, which is one of the rejection criteria. Furthermore, they are often in areas with dubious pedestrian access (e.g. on the curb or the gutter of the road) or encroach on private residential property (e.g. in someone’s driveway). While it is not possible to categorically deem a type of nomination ineligible, and there may be a very special NSW Survey Mark that I am not aware of, I have not seen any during my reviewing which I would consider to meet the Wayfarer criteria.

There are some survey markers (or similar features) which are significant and do have individual eligibility.

Title: Point Zero
Description: Point Zero was adopted in 1925 as the origin of all WA road measurements.
Location: -31.955898,115.860553

Title: Bunbury Townsite Peg No 1
Description: This is the original site of Survey Peg No 1 for the Bunbury Townsite, placed by surveyor H. M. Ommaney in 1841. The site was commemorated with a plaque in 1988 as part of the Bicentennial celebrations.
Location: -33.327202,115.647818

Title: Cameron Corner
Description: The marker placed at the point where the borders of the three states of NSW, OLD, and SA meet. During summer, walking around the maker results in passing through three different timezones.
Location: -28.999095,140.999251

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@TheDoctorBird adding link here.